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Dean Markham named Fellow of King’s College London

7/23/2013
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Curtis Prather
Tel: 703-461-1782
Email: cprather@vts.edu

Alexandria, VA
– Virginia Seminary is proud to announce that the Very Rev. Ian S. Markham, dean and president of VTS, was elected a Fellow of King’s College London during the graduation for the humanities on Monday, July 22, 2013.

Founded in 1829, King’s is the third-oldest university in England, having been founded by King George IV and the Duke of Wellington, and seven years later became one of the founding colleges of the University of London. The Fellowship of King’s was established in 1847 by the Council of King’s. It is the most prestigious award the college can give, acknowledging distinguished service to the college or the achievement of distinction by those who were at one time closely associated with the college.

Markham is a graduate of King’s, earning his B.D. in theology in 1985. He also served as sabbatical welfare officer for the King’s College London Student Union. Since becoming dean and president of VTS in 2007, he has been actively involved in King’s alumni activities in the Washington DC area.

“Ian continues to support theology at King’s, not least in hosting several research visits of mine to help develop my research and publications,” said Rev. Professor Richard Burridge, dean of King’s College London. “As an active and enthusiastic alumnus, a well-respected scholar and writer, and a thoughtful priest and pastor, Ian Markham demonstrates the best of the King’s motto, Sancte et Sapienter (‘With Holiness and Wisdom’).”

Previous King’s College Fellowship recipients include Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Bishop Charles Gore, writer Evelyn Underhill, filmmaker Richard Attenborough, author Arthur C. Clarke and former Archbishop of Canterbury, the Rt. Rev. George Leonard Carey.

Markham is the author and editor of numerous books, including several focused on Christian and Muslim interfaith dialogue. He is acknowledged as a world expert on the 20th century Muslim theologian Said Nursi.

Founded in 1823, Virginia Theological Seminary is the largest of the 11 accredited seminaries of the Episcopal Church. The school prepares men and women for service in the Church worldwide, both as ordained and lay ministers, and offers a number of professional degree programs and diplomas. Currently, the Seminary represents more than 42 different dioceses and 5 different countries, in service of the Church. For more information, please visit vts.edu.